Eliminating Systemized Member Irritation

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If there is a serious weakness within most continuity programs I’m asked to evaluate it’s that the marketer stops selling after a customer buys and joins his continuity program. Look, I understand, it’s a lot of work to ship out the product purchased together with delivering on all of our commitments within the monthly continuity programs. It’s easy to forget about selling in addition to everything else you have to get done. Am I suggesting that you have to do more? No, not more. Just different. Associations recognize that they are always selling. This can make them frustrating to deal with because they are so risk adverse. They don’t want to do anything to anger even a single member.

How To Double Your Continuity Membership Retention in Half the Time

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While a lot of continuity marketers struggle with growing their lower priced, large number of member programs, I also hear frustration with retention within high-priced continuity programs. Coaching members get a big head, think they know everything, and drop out. Often, the coaching member is even resentful even though everything was delivered exactly as promised. The key to long-term retention is recognizing that your members’ needs change as they grow within your program. One of the key leadership strategies is to have a common mission together with values. For years within the association world I knew it was important to create a set of shared values among the members. When members embraced the mission of the organization and the values, they put that way above the money to renew their memberships. In fact, it never occurred to them that they would ever not be a member of an organization that … Continued

Do THIS and Members will Get Better Results and Retain their Membership for Years Instead of Weeks

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  I was completely pinned against the back wall of the swimming pool, water gushing at my face, in my mouth, nose and eyes. I was never so happy to be out of a pool. This was my first time learning how to swim in one of those stationary pools. It’s a similar concept to walking on a treadmill except it’s a pool. There’s a flow of current coming from a large jet. Your goal is to swim against the current so you are able to get your “laps” in and never move. You can swim like it’s an Olympic size swimming pool in an 8’ X 10’ area. Only problem, this was my first time using one of these things. At first the current was too slow. Every time I tried to swim I’d swim faster than the current and start slapping the side of the pool right above … Continued